Changes at Home

Robin botie of Ithaca, New York, photographs home with her inherited Havanese dog.In my home, where I sing and dance, and talk out loud to the life-size portrait of my dead daughter when I’m not talking to my inherited dog, I nervously picked crumbs off the floors. My friend Hussein was on his way over to see the guest room. I’d never rented it to a guy before. And I was afraid Hussein didn’t like dogs. So when he pulled up in his car, I scooped Suki into my arms before she could erupt into her ferocious greeting.

“Come in,” I said, squeezing Suki. She squirmed and emitted small choking sounds through the hand I’d clamped over her snout. Hussein’s eyes ricocheted off every surface of the house, and I wondered if he spotted spider webs in the corners or the mezuzah with the tiny Hebrew prayer scroll that my uncle Max had given me as a housewarming gift fifteen years ago.

“This is home,” I said, surveying the walls covered with photos of my daughter, the cracked concrete countertops, the stacks of papers, the view of the pond. Suki growled in my arms. “This is the bathroom,” I said, grateful the kitty litter from my old cat no longer monopolized the space. “Here’s the laundry room.” I remembered bottomless piles of clothes from a long gone husband and young children. “The dog chews holes in your underwear if you leave it on the floor,” I said. Hussein looked at Suki. She grunted.

“She doesn’t like men,” I stated, bouncing her. “This is the work table.” Visions of children doing homework flashed in my head. Suki writhed. “Is it okay to let her down?” Hussein assured me he had no problems with dogs. I put Suki on the floor.

“That’s the upstairs where my son lives when he’s in town. He comes and goes at weird hours. You get used to it.” I thought of the mess upstairs, except for the quiet room that was my daughter’s. “We’re not going there,” I said. “Here’s your room (if you take it). Oh, we get an occasional mouse in the house,” I added, needing to divulge all the shortcomings. In my mind, I saw the last girl who lived in the guest room. She didn’t mind mice. She would sit, reading on the bed amid perfumed pillows. Suki used to invite herself up on the bed to sit by her. Suki loved that last girl.
“Your dog loves me,” Hussein said. His head was bent at a strange angle. “What is she doing?” he asked. I looked down and saw Suki was wrapped firmly around his leg. Horrified, I stood speechless.
“She’s humping you,” I finally spit out the only words I could come up with.

A couple of weeks later Hussein called to say he would not need the room. By then, I had told myself there’d be no more prancing around in pajamas with a guy in the house. So it was a relief to know home would not have to change in that regard. I felt sorry though, for Suki.

 

What are the differences between your house and your home?

 

Share Button

8 thoughts on “Changes at Home

  1. Ginger Dawn Harman

    I have always wondered what having a renter would be like and I have wondered what would happen if I had a mother that lived with me. Enjoyed the post. Sending mindful energy.

    Reply
    1. Robin Botie Post author

      Hi Ginger. Welcome to my site. Thank you so much for responding. I highly recommend renting a room in one’s home. Especially if you live alone or live off the beaten path. You would each need to have your private spots in the house of course, and it has to be someone you like. Or at least don’t dislike. I wonder what kind of mother you’re thinking. A mother with a child? Or a mother that needs a child? Having someone else live in your house is like moving the furniture around. It changes your home but adds a warmth and a new dimension. And maybe it even adds warmth and new dimension to one’s self. Cheers!

      Reply
  2. Elaine Mansfield

    I haven’t even considered renting a room in my house, although many people think it would be a good idea. I can’t imagine living with anyone other than a few close friends who visit and stay for as long as they want. Willow wishes I would change my mind about this. She likes everyone.

    Reply
    1. Robin Botie Post author

      I highly recommend renting a room in one’s home. Especially if you are alone and off the beaten path. As long as you each have your private spots in the house. Of course, it has to be someone you like. Or at least don’t dislike. But it warms a house and is like moving the furniture around. It changes your home but adds a warmth and a new dimension. Maybe it even adds warmth and new dimension to one’s self. ? Cheers, Elaine.

      Reply
    1. Robin Botie Post author

      Wendy, I’m very delighted to hear from you. yes, Suki is a rascal. But she makes life more interesting as, I’m sure, your rascals do for you. Have a great holiday.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *